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Fashion Wall Art

The Kiss By Gustav Klimt

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Lady with Fan By Gustav Klimt

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Street Art - Banksy's Birds Flying

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The Lady of Shalott By Waterhouse

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Storm on the Sea of Galilee by Rembrandt

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Mother and Child By Gustav Klimt

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Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer By Gustav Klimt

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Heading Home

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A Sunday on La Grande Jatte by Seurat

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Whistler's Mother by James Abbott

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Water Serpents By Gustav Klimt

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Park of Romance, Black and White

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Abstract Hair, Original (rectangle)

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The Virgin By Gustav Klimt

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Four Seasons By Alphonse Mucha

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The Night Watch By Rembrandt

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Naked Emotion

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The Kiss By Gustav Klimt (long)

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Water Serpent I By Gustav Klimt

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The Kiss By Gustav Klimt (square)

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Street Art - Banksy's Alice in Wonderland

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Girl with Pearl Earring By Vermeer

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Mona Lisa By Da Vinci

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Fulfillment, Stoclet Frieze By Gustav Klimt

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Stoclet Frieze - Expectation By Gustav Klimt

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Street Art - Banksy's Dismaland

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The Three Ages of Woman by Gustav Klimt

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The Milkmaid By Vermeer

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Fashion Prints

Quickly and easily, you can express your style and add a chic touch to your space with our collection of fashion wall art. Fashion art began in the 16th century with the advent of global discovery, which led to an obsession with the different clothing customs and styles of cultures all around the world. Used originally as a vehicle to depict appropriate garments to be worn socially (specifically for distinction in social class) fashion artwork began to take on the form of artwork of its own with the publication of the first fashion magazines in the 1670s. From its origins in linework and printing through to the digitally created styles we know today, fashion prints have evolved with the ebbs and flows of the biggest art movements of modern history to remain a mainstay of the cultural zeitgeist.

Fashion in Art

Fashion and art often go hand in hand. Costumes, dress, garments, whatever you want to call it, inspire artists to no end. This clothing also acts as a time capsule of the time, showing future generations just how people dressed, from ordinary people to exquisite royalty. Some artists even captured the outliers of their generation, those who didn’t play within society’s rules, as Gustav Klimt did in The Kiss, and Edouard Manet did in Ragpicker.  

The Kiss by Gustav Klimt

A frequent Klimt collaborator was Emilie Louise Flöge. This lively woman was a fashion designer. Flöge was born in 1874 and went on to become an innovative fashion designer, businesswoman, and muse and confidant to Gustav Klimt. Along with her sister and mother, Flöge led a fashion salon in the first half of the 1900s in Austria. This company was a feminine affair and saw no man as part of it. Flöge’s radical designs saw her cast away the tight restrictions, both physically and socially, of the corset, making her possibly one of the first women in Europe to do so. Unsurprisingly, this caused a scandal. But Flöge was accustomed to scandal. She had been the key figure in Gustav Klimt’s The Kiss, which, upon exhibit, sent shockwaves through Vienna. 

A Sunday on La Grande Jatte by Seurat

In Georges Seurat’s A Sunday on La Grande Jattewe see a group of Parisian bourgeoisie enjoying a leisurely Sunday under the sun. All these people are well dressed, not surprising as the bourgeoisie of the time often dressed well, even on a lazy Sunday! There are women taking shade under chic parasols and men looking dapper and dashing in top hats and suits. In the distance, wearing dark green jackets, are two soldiers from the Saint-Cyr military academy. A Sunday on La Grande Jatte debuted on the last Impressionist exhibition in 1884. At this exhibition, a critic invented the name Neo-Impressionism, to mark the shift from the old to a new emerging remix of the style. 

Four Seasons by Alphonse Mucha

Alphonse Mucha’s women, that is those elongated, dreamlike figures his work is best known for, wear an assortment of delicious and beautiful colours. They are wispy and dreamlike in dresses that seem to be weightless and floating through the air.

Girl with a Pearl Earring by Vermeer

The oriental turban the model wears evoke something exotic for the artist who painted her. Vermeer had never left his hometown and birthplace of Delft, Netherlands, and perhaps desired to explore the greater world. At the time, turbans were popular fashion accessories, and the strip of deep blue is one of the most iconic fashion moments in art. The oversized pearl on her ear shines from her ear.

The Milkmaid by Vermeer

The titular subject in Vermeer’s The Milkmaid stands brightly in a room with white floors and darker grounds. The milkmaid wears bright yellow and a deep, intense blue that evokes the palette of Vermeer’s other famous painting Girl with a Pearl Earring. At the time, Vermeer possessed a limited colour palette. He wasn’t the only one. Most of his contemporaries played with a restricted colour palette. Here, we see lead-tin yellow and ultramarine blue bursting off the canvas, specifically in the woman’s fashion. Her attire is a simple blue skirt and a yellow shirt. 

Courtesan: after Eisen by Vincent Van Gogh

For a time, Vincent van Gogh was interested in Japanese culture. Many Japanese woodcuts and prints inspired van Gogh. The artist expresses his interest in the painting Courtesan: after Eisen, inspired by a wood print by the Japanese artist Kesai Eisen. Van Gogh didn’t go to Japan to see this print. The image was reproduced on the cover of a French magazine. Van Gogh’s courtesan dances in a brightly coloured kimono, identified by her hairstyle and the belt (the obi) tied to the front of her kimono. To enhance her brightness, van Gogh places her against a yellow backdrop. What’s more, he framed her with bamboo stems, cranes, a pond filled with water lilies and frogs. 

Fashion in Dance

Fashion is a vital part of the art of dance, necessary for its versatility and costuming. From classical ballet to contemporary hip hop, it’s a genre that is ever-changing. Let’s take a look at a couple of dance genres and their sense of fashion.

Street Salsa

One of the more notable aspects of Salsa dancing, besides the dance moves, is the costumes. These costumes are known for their vibrant colours and the shimmer of the material. There are lots of sequins, embroidery, and bright, bold colours. The clothing material is versatile and allows for flexible movement, as is necessary for these fast and savvy dancers.

Ballet

Ballet dancers wear one of the most identifiable garments of clothing in dance and beyond. The pink stockings and matching tutu grace the stages of some of the most prestigious concert halls. The Ballerinas' fast footwork and high jumps have inspired both artists and spectators. Edgar Degas is the painter most closely associated with ballet. His depictions of dance go beyond the performance stage. He often sat backstage with the dancers as they rehearsed, uniquely capturing them in a moment most spectators would never be privy to.

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