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Photography Prints

Beach Path

from $43.50
WAS $58.00 SAVE $14.50

Beach Path (Long)

from $71.25
WAS $95.00 SAVE $23.75

Stormy the Highland Cow

from $43.50
WAS $58.00 SAVE $14.50

Cockatoos Trio Art Set

from $138.75
WAS $185.00 SAVE $46.25

Palm Cove Dawn

from $79.50
WAS $106.00 SAVE $26.50

Sky Stream

from $43.50
WAS $58.00 SAVE $14.50

Gum Tree Road

from $79.50
WAS $106.00 SAVE $26.50

Whitewashed Coast of WA

from $46.50
WAS $62.00 SAVE $15.50

Winter Wren By Nadya Neklioudova (Long)

from $79.50
WAS $106.00 SAVE $26.50

United Again By Marc Huybrighs

from $79.50
WAS $106.00 SAVE $26.50

Escaped (long)

from $71.25
WAS $95.00 SAVE $23.75

Pathway To The Sea (Portrait)

from $43.50
WAS $58.00 SAVE $14.50

Lightning Over Glasshouse Mountains (long)

from $79.50
WAS $106.00 SAVE $26.50

Glimmering Sunrise (square)

from $46.50
WAS $62.00 SAVE $15.50

Driftwood Sunrise (Long)

from $71.25
WAS $95.00 SAVE $23.75

Central Park Dawn in Snow

from $43.50
WAS $58.00 SAVE $14.50

Australian Outback Sunset (long)

from $71.25
WAS $95.00 SAVE $23.75

Coles Bay Glow

from $79.50
WAS $106.00 SAVE $26.50

Pandanus Palms (square)

from $46.50
WAS $62.00 SAVE $15.50

Glimmering Sunrise

from $46.50
WAS $62.00 SAVE $15.50

Melbourne Skyline, Black and White (long)

from $71.25
WAS $95.00 SAVE $23.75

Soft Waterfalls, Original (Long)

from $71.25
WAS $95.00 SAVE $23.75

Tranquil Beach (Long)

from $71.25
WAS $95.00 SAVE $23.75

Row of Beach Boxes (Long)

from $71.25
WAS $95.00 SAVE $23.75

Paradise Beach (long)

from $71.25
WAS $95.00 SAVE $23.75

Scarlet Forest

from $43.50
WAS $58.00 SAVE $14.50

Beach Sunset (long)

from $71.25
WAS $95.00 SAVE $23.75

Black Cockatoo Print Side Grunge

from $43.50
WAS $58.00 SAVE $14.50

Photography Art

Capturing a moment in time in its actuality, photography prints is a timeless style that encompasses a huge variety of trends. From hidden woodlands to inspiring city architecture, you’ll find something you’ll like to compliment any room. Photography wall art rose as a mainstay of art with the advent of the industry of photography in the 1850s. Widely known for its encapsulation of any subject in a realistic style, it relies on traditional fine art principles such as composition, compilation, balance and contrast to deliver a decidedly unique medium, characterised in the qualities of tone, texture and light. Photography prints have evolved over the last century and is augmented in many cases by the rise of digital technology, however, the style itself remains as important in its roots today as ever before, offering a unique artistic perspective on life that resonates with modern audiences.

Photography as an artform

Photography was invented around the 1850s and emerged as an art form in the late 1800s. it was a revolutionary tool in art as this new invention could now capture its subjects realistically and then allowed painters to experiment with their medium. While some photographers captured scenes realistically, there were some artists who added elements of fantasy to serve their vision. Man Ray was one artist who added an element of Surrealism to his photographs. One of the early works of art photography was that of John Edwin Mayall in the mid-eighteenth century. By the following century, the medium flourished as cameras became economically accessible to more people. However, not everyone with a camera is an artist. Some simply record what is in front of them (i.e., photojournalism), while a fine art photographer uses the camera as a tool to reveal their vision.

Principles of Photography Art

Like other art forms such as painting, film, and illustration, skilled art photography depends on composition, compilation, balance, contrast, texture, light and tone. Knowing these principles leads to better photographs.

Famous Photographers

Artists have used photography to express and explore their ideas since the invention of this piece of technology in the mid-eighteenth century. Artists use photography not to capture reality or produce an advertisement but to use it as a tool that serves their artistic idea. This has resulted in many photographers taking their unique approach to the art form, resulting in different styles and voices. Let’s take a look at some of the most famous artists creating photography art.

Ansel Adams

There are landscape painters, then there are landscape photographers. Ansel Adams is certainly one of the first landscape photographers of our time. His breathtaking black and white photographs of the American West are revered to this day. The Museum of Modern Art has Ansel Adams to thank as he was vital for establishing the photography department there. He is most famous for capturing Yosemite National Park and is remembered for his conservation efforts.

Alfred Stieglitz

One man Ansel Adams was inspired by was the photographer Alfred Stieglitz. The American photographer was an instrumental figure in promoting photography art, and his career which spanned fifty years helped in the acceptance of photography as being an art form. He paid close attention to the composition and tonality of his images. Stieglitz has several famous photographs, but perhaps those of his wife, the artist Georgia O’Keeffe, are highly regarded. From 1917 to 1937, Stieglitz went on to take over 300 photographs of O’Keeffe.

Man Ray

Man Ray was a visual artist practising in painting and photography, becoming an important figure in twentieth-century art. For Ray, whatever he couldn’t capture with the paintbrush he did so with the camera, and vice versa. The Avant-Garde artists of Europe deeply influence Man Ray. He also became involved in the Dada movement in 1912, after meeting Marcel Duchamp, where he abandoned conventional painting and started to make objects and explore new ways of creating photographic images that didn’t require a camera. His introduction to photography came from Alfred Stieglitz.

Cindy Sherman

Cindy Sherman’s artworks explore identity, celebrity, gender, all through photography, usually using herself as the subject of her work. Some early work that established Sherman as an artist on the New York art scene was her Untitled Film Stills (1977-80), a series of images that resembled those from mid-twentieth century B movies, using herself as a subject.

Famous Photograph Wall Art

It’s thanks to the photographer Alfred Stieglitz who fought to have photography considered as an art form. Photography has changed throughout the last two centuries, but some aspects of the medium remain consistent, these being the principles of photography. Let’s take a look at some of the most famous photographs to inspire you.

99 Cent II Diptychon (2001) Andreas Gursky

The German photographer Andreas Gursky has created several large-scale images that reflect human consumerism and consumption in the modern world, but none are more striking than his 2001 photograph 99 Cent II Diptychon. The photograph depicts the inside of a .99 cent store, the camera at an elevated position focused on isles filled with shelf after shelf of brightly coloured consumer food. There is so much colour, patterns, and texture in 99 Cent II Diptychon that it can almost be mistaken for a painting.

Nautilus (1927) Edward Watson

In 1927, Edward Watson took a single shell and photographed it in a way that caused it to look like a human figure. This became Nautilus, one of the most famous photographs ever. The inspiration behind the painting came from the work of Watson’s friend, the artist Henrietta Shore, who was working on several paintings of the seashells. Nautilus contains the core characteristics of a photograph, which is tone, composition, and symmetry. 

Michael Baryshnikov, White Oak, Florida (1990) Annie Leibovitz

The American photographer Annie Leibovitz’s oftentimes looks like a painting. Her work is, in fact, evocative of the master painters who captured portraits, like Vermeer and Ingres, but for a contemporary audience. She’s photographed celebrities, artists, and even politicians. Although her portraits are not vacuous and capture the subject’s most inner self. With her portraits of the dancer Mikhail Baryshnikov, Leibovitz quickly learnt that she couldn’t capture the movement of dance with a camera, but she could capture the person dancing. What she had planned to create a series of report-style portraits of Baryshnikov’s dance troupe quickly switched to artistic portraits.

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